(240) 317-5303

18 Feb 2014

Warm Up
250m row
20 good mornings pvc/bar
20 overhead squats pvc/bar
20 barbell row pvc/bar
20 sit ups

Samson Stretch

Skill
Forward Roll

WOD
21-15-9
Deadlift
Calorie Row

L1: 60% deadlift 1RM
L2: 205/155#
L3: 235/185#

Mobility:
Hip/Glute

17 Feb 2014

Warm Up
Junkyard Dog
20 overhead squats pvc/bar
Burgener Warm Up (clean)

Samson Stretch

Strength
Power Clean
20 mins to achieve 1RM

WOD
2 rounds:
Sled push 80yds
20 pull ups
20 push ups
50 sit ups
3 min rest

Accessory Work
200 sit ups (L2/3: weighted with plate or ball)
Mobility
Shoulder and Thoracic Spine

15 Feb 2014

Warm Up:
400m run
20 ring dips
20 pull ups
20 overhead squats pvc/bar
20 hip extensions

Samson stretch

WOD
AMRAP 10 mins (13.2)
115/75# Shoulder to overhead, 5 reps
115/75# pound Deadlift, 10 reps
15 Box jumps, 24/20″ box

L1: 50% press 1RM, choose box height
L2: As written

Cool Down/Mobility:
Shoulder mobility

14 Feb 2014

Warm Up

Junkyard Dog
20 overhead squats pvc/bar
2 sets 2 sotts press pvc/bar
Burgener Warm Up

Samson Stretch

Strength
Snatch
20 mins to work up to a 1RM

Accessory Work
4 sets of 5 Sotts Press
2 sets of 10 ring dips (L3: weighted)

Mobility
Quad/Hamstring

13 Feb 2014

Warm Up:

250m row
3 min AMRAP
3 pull ups
5 push ups
15 air squats

Samson Stretch

WOD- 15 min cutoff
10/1…1/10
Bench Press
Pull Ups

L1: 50% 1RM Bench Press
L2: 125/65
L3: 160/85

Mobility:
Shoulder/Upper Back

11 Feb 2014

Warm Up
2 rounds of
10 burpees
10 pull ups
10 knees to elbows
10 overhead squats
Samson Stretch

Skill:
Handstand Skill Work 

WOD:

Tabata Air Squats

Tabata Pull-Ups

Tabata Push Ups

Tabata Sit Ups

Accessory Work
Sled Push x 2

Cool Down/Mobility:
Thoracic Spine MWOD

10 Feb 2014

Warm Up

2 mins double unders
2 min sit ups
20 overhead squat with pvc/bar
20 good mornings pvc/bar

Samson stretch

Strength
Back Squat
8 sets of 2, working up to a 2 RM

WOD
30-20-10
Wall Ball
Box Jump

L1: choose ball weight and box height
L2: 20/14#, 24/20”
L3: 20/14#, 30/24”

Accessory Work
3 min hollow hold
3 sets of 10 ring dips
3 sets of 10 Glute Ham Raises

Mobility:
hip flexors/hamstrings

8 Feb 2014

Warm Up:
3 rounds
5 burpees
5 pull ups
10 overhead squats with PVC
15 sit ups

Samson Stretch

Strength:
2 sets of 10 weighted pull ups

WOD
1K row
20 lunges barbell in front rack (10 per side)
20 double unders
20 thruster
20 double unders
20 push press
20 double unders
20 power clean
20 double unders

L1: 65/45#
L2: 75/55#
L3: 95/65#

Accessory Work
100 sit ups for time

Mobility
Shoulder

7 Feb 2014

Warm Up:
200m run
junkyard dog
20 overhead squats with pvc/bar
Burgener Warm Up (Clean)
Samson Stretch

Strength:
EMOM 10 mins
1 Squat Clean
Score = total weight lifted

WOD:
Grace
For Time:
30 Clean and Jerk

L1: 60% 1 RM
L2: 135/95#
L3: 135/95#, rest 2 mins, 3 attempts at most double under unbroken

Mobility/Cool Down:
Cervical spine/neck MWOD

Amy Hanson

This week’s athlete of the week is Amy Hanson.  Amy refuses to settle for less than her best, which drives her to work hard… very hard… at the gym.  She is dedicated to being the best athlete she can be and we love that about her.  Pictured above, Amy is practicing her bar muscle ups after class.  She takes every opportunity to work on skills, strength, and accessory work that will drive her to the next level.  Amy shares a little bit about her ‘journey’ in this post, and it is a story I believe a lot of people will be able to relate to and hopefully be encouraged by.  In her words:

“Always do what you are afraid to do.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

“As long as I can remember, I have been athletic—I was always outside kicking or throwing ball as a child, played a variety of sports through high school, and played lacrosse at a small DI school in college. Despite my natural proclivity for sports, I was never a great at running. I grew up with (and still have) asthma and running was always a huge problem for me. So after college, I did the thing that scared me the most, I started distance running and eventually completed several marathons and even more ultramarathons. A couple of years ago when I started getting injuries from so much running, I got back into lifting weights (I had dabbled off and on since high school). Even though I was staying active, something was missing. I wasn’t getting stronger and every workout felt like a chore. I started reading more and more about CrossFit and tried it out for myself by taking a free intro class at the bunker in the summer of 2012. Nearly six months after my first WOD, I finally joined CrossFit Pax.

What took me so long to join? Fear. I never doubted that I would enjoy the physical challenge of CrossFit; it was the working out with other people, the accountability of having someone else assess my daily performance, of which I was most fearful. Sure, the WODs would be tough, but the fear of being closely scrutinized as an athlete absolutely terrified me. I knew that working out with other people meant that those other people would hold me accountable not only to push my limits, but to tell me when to back off. When I realized what was holding me back from joining CrossFit Pax, I knew it was exactly what I needed to do in order to face my fears and grow as a person. Once I joined, I was hooked.

I believe that in doing that which we are most afraid to do, we create our defining moments—moments of growth, moments in which we become stronger. With that in mind, I am sharing my story. What most people as CrossFit Pax don’t know about me is that I have struggled with disordered eating and overexercising issues for a very long time. I have a natural tendency to go to extremes—if a little is good, a lot must be better. In an effort to get fitter and thinner, for many years I was stuck in a destructive of exercise more and eat less. Exercise became something I had to do in order to look a certain way and fit into a certain size, rather than something I enjoyed for how it made me feel. I was a vegetarian, but I ate little more than vegetables. Thankfully, I found CrossFit, which changed my life.

The CrossFit philosophy turned my old thought pattern upside down: don’t do more, do less but with greater intensity; treat your body in a way so that it can perform to its best ability. That said, my greatest accomplishment in CrossFit has not been so much a physical one as a mental one. While I am happy with the weights I can lift, I am most proud of my change in mindset. I fuel my body so it can perform well—I eat meat now (and lots of it). I take rest days so my muscles can heal and get stronger. I am proud of what my body can do on a given day, rather than hating it for what it can’t yet do, or even worse, what it looks like. And as cliché as it sounds, I no longer aim to be thin; I aim to be healthy and strong and able. I have fun working out again! There are amazing, kind, caring people at CrossFit Pax who inspire me every day and remind me that there is more to life than how fast you run or how much you deadlift or how long it takes you to do Fran. Without the support and encouragement of my CrossFit friends, I wouldn’t be nearly as strong as I am today.

One of my main goals in CrossFit is to spread my love of movement and health. I want other people to realize that, with the proper mindset and a little hard work, there is nothing they can’t do. I want others in the gym to experience the pure joy that comes from accomplishing something they initially doubted they could do. I want them to recognize that it’s not really about the numbers—the time, the weight, the reps. It’s about breaking down mental barriers, facing your fears, and doing that thing that you are most afraid of doing. The mental strength you gain from CrossFit will far outweigh those plates you start stacking on the bar.

That said, I do have personal athletic goals as well. I have a running list of about 10 goals right now and have it posted in a place where I see it every day. Right now, those goals include: body weight snatch; 250 lb deadlift; 225 lb squat; learn to string together muscle ups; and become more proficient at butterfly pull ups. I also want to start rowing more—I hate it and avoid it at all costs, so obviously I need to do it!”

Amy’s advice for someone who may be “on the fence” about starting:

“I would ask them the reason they don’t want to do it and then I would tell them that that is the exact reason they need to do it. Whether physically or emotionally, CrossFit will take you out of your comfort zone. You will get frustrated, you will cry (I cartainly have!), you will want to quit. But if you stick with it, you will grow. You will become stronger in body, mind, and spirit. You will be better equipped to fight whatever demons you are fighting. Challenge yourself in the gym and you will find that things outside of the gym become not only physically easier, but mentally easier as well.”

Amy, thank you for your sincerity and wise words.  Thank you for being brave enough to jump into CrossFit, for being an important part of the CrossFit PAX community, and for taking time to share your experience and thoughts with us.  You are a powerhouse of an athlete BECAUSE you work so hard, you analyze, you educate yourself, and then you overcome your fears.

Great job with the 5 unbroken bar muscle ups today- watching you fight through the fifth one was very symbolic of all you have said here- you could have stopped when you got stuck and saved it for another day, but you didn’t.  Keep fighting those fears, keep your head in the game, and give everything you do YOUR best.  We are excited to see what your next year brings!